Newnan Pratlaw's Posts On Hot Legal Topics

June 17, 2009

AN INJURY CASE IS A DIFFICULT CASE

Filed under: Law and Fact and Presentation = success — thebigpraetor @ 3:52 pm

In my two plus decades of experience I have come to the opinion that injury cases are the most difficult case an attorney can handle for a client because they involve more statutes than any other type of case and they are fact intensive to the point where the value of a case can hinge on what the casual observer might think was the most obscure fact.

I settled a road wreck case for $250,000 that a previous attorney was on the verge of settling for $38,000. Why? The client had no broken bones, had spend a night in observation in the hospital and had $4,000 in medical bills ~ because my experience told me that I should meet the person who had caused the wreck in person before signing off on what had almost been negotiated. I subpoenaed him to come to the office and meet with me whereupon I immediately saw that he had a bulbus nose that would have made W. C. Fields proud and told the client to wait until I had a private detective follow him around for a few days … what the private detective filmed blew the case wide open.

this is a little interview form that I would like every prospective client that comes in to meet with me to be familiar with and ready to answer:
http://www.gabar.org/public/pdf/LPM/picis.pdf

The true story above is one of many that not only I, but any genuine personal injury lawyer with years of training and experience can share. It is the knowledge of the law involved and facts and the proper way to prepare the presentation of the melding of the two to a judge, arbitrator or jury that positions a case for a successful outcome.

While the story above is not typical by any means, it is true and is used herein as an illustration of the hard work necessary and sometimes inspiration need, to successfully conclude an injury case.

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